Take a break and read something new.

The newly launched weekly writing prompts are designed for you, by world renowned authors and poets. Your creative writing responses are accepted weekly and posted every Monday.

Your own life has inspired a movie. Write the opening or closing scenes adding details like characters, setting, and dialogue. 🎥

A Land’s Relent

by Catherine Dorian

My Villa in france

by Linda Freedland

One Boy’s Life

by Duane L. Herrmann

Birth to death

by June Kosier

Summer’s end for a seven year old

by Mary Perrin Scott

A Champion (Adapted)

by Edward Pontacoloni

Write an ode to a friend, praising the subject in all their glory. Do not use the word “I” at all. ☕️

Lost dogs in foggy nites

by Christopher Bruno

in awe of the whales

by Linda Freedland

ode to james

by Duane L. Herrmann

these are my buds

by Marea Needle

ode to the earthworm

by Mary Perrin Scott

a non lyric and unsung ode to her

by Leslie Sittner

Write about a poem about a superhero coming to your house and confronting you about something. Somewhere in the poem, you have to state what your superpower is. 🪂

Beyond

by Ruth Ann Dandrea

my first epic

by Karen Davidson

Wonder woman of the web

by Linda Freedland

a visit from wonder woman

by Judyann Grant

a supernatural experience

by June Kosier

An english sonnet: for DJT

by Paul Lamar

fleeting fantasy, forging fire

by S. Parker

i saw my hero

by Mary Perrin Scott

i am not wonder woman

by Joni Youse

Mary Shartle’s “May you live in interesting times.” Recently we are experiencing extraordinary times in the United States and globally. Pick a time of major crisis in your life. Write about how you found peace, either in solitude or in community during that time. 🕰

The Errant path

by Christopher Bruno

Hemorrhagic Stroke

by Janet Burl

releve

by Ruth Ann Dandrea

my first serious predicament

by Kernan Davis

stones in my road

by Linda Freedland

The hummingbird Reminded Me

by Judyann Grant

Games my brother played

by Duane L. Herrmann

pink

by June Kosier

a friend of dorothy

by Paul Lamar

gift of forgiveness

by Mara Lefebvre

Smoke rising, 2020 edition

by S.L. Parker

Spiritual crisis

by Mary Perrin Scott

Tapestry

by Terry Rainey

senseless

by Leslie Sittner

may 2000

by Joni Youse

Find and choose a book near you. Challenge yourself by writing using only words found in the first and last sentences of each chapter. 👓

places (Abridged)

by Linda Freedland

something to crow about

by Nancy Kimball

anamnesis

by Marea Needle

Scandal

by Mary Perrin Scott

Marilyn McCabe’s What I Can’t Throw Away: Describe that thing you just can’t Marie-Kondo out of your life. It may not exactly bring you joy, but…you just can’t let it go. Describe it so clearly we can all see it. Give it voice. Tell your story through it. 🎒

BLACK LEATHER BOOTS

by Lorraine Caramanna

…And read

by Ruth Ann Dandrea

blue booklets

by Nicky Falck

The Besh-ge-tours bears

by Linda Freedland

keeping karen

by Judyann Grant

clenched teeth

by Christophe Jackals

rufus and bugs

by June Kosier

Somerlid

by Paul Lamar

knick-knack fantasy

by Mary Perrin Scott

the clay pendant

by Leslie Sittner

the case of the phantom fortune

by Joni Youse

my phone

by Alexander Zaborek

Choose a major historical event. Write from the perspective of an unexpected witness to the event. 🕵️‍♀️

under the crescent moon

by Lorraine Caramanna

my name is krypta

by Kernan Davis

orville-or kate?

by Linda Freedland

he saw me

by Judyann Grant

the symbol of scotland explained

by June Kosier

new year’s eve

by Paul Lamar

truman and mom

by Mary Perrin Scott

the peeping tom

by Edward Pontacoloni

honeymoon

by Terry Rainey

911

by Pat Steadman

gettysburg

by Susan Whiteman

Chris Tebbetts’ Choose from one of these three first lines: 1) All I know is this: 2) It was dark in the car. 3) The rain came down like…. Now, write a passage or scene that only includes words of four letters or less. It can be frustrating at first, but if you stick with it, you will likely find a rhythm, and might be surprised at what you come up with. 🚗

This dry, dry day

by Janet Burl

sick ribs and all that jazz

by Lorraine Caramanna

All I know this this

by Ruth Ann Dandrea

take each job all the way

by Patricia Davidson

Long, Long ago

by Kernan Davis

It was dark in the car

by Linda Freedland

Grandpa Andy

by Bari Falese

The twin

by William Gilbert

Untitled

by Judyann Grant

this is true

by June Kosier

cats and dogs

by Paul Lamar

Bridie by

by Jean Lavin

all i know is this

by Ron Lavalette

all i know is this

by Marea Needle

Pomp…

by Mary Perrin Scott

in the woods i saw an elk

by Edward Pontacoloni

All i know is this

by Leslie Sittner

good gnus

by Terry Rainey

fake dark

by Joni Youse

Write about getting a DNA test just for fun, but learn some surprising news in the results, and the aftermath of those results. 🧬 Creative Writing Responses

double helix

by Lorraine Caramanna

DNA Testing

by Ruth Ann Dandrea

DNA Testing

by Kernan Davis

Names have been changed to protect the innocent

by Kathy DeLong

A gift that keeps on giving

by Linda Freedland

Surprise: Scottish

by June Kosier

shop talk

by Paul Lamar

explosive dna

by Mary Perrin Scott

my ancestors

by Terry Rainey

dna testing

by Pat Steadman

dna: Do not assume

by Susan Whiteman

Lauren Whitehead’s Everything in the world feels so big and overwhelming right now. At least that’s how it feels for me. So I might suggest that we try to write into the opposite of that feeling. I might suggest that we write something small. Try a teeny confession. Try a teeny compliment. Write a tiny conversation. A tiny love letter. The littlest ode to the smallest object you love, something that can fit whole in your hand. So much is intangible right now, so consider something you can actually touch, or taste or take with you in your pocket. Conjure that teeny tiniest thing and live with the minutiae of it for a minute. ✨ Creative Writing Responses

held within

by Janet Burl

Telescoping

by Ruth Ann Dandrea

try a little restraint

by Karen Davidson Seward

My little hedgehog

by Linda Freedland

The Shilling

by William Gilbert

buttons

by June Kozier

Mirage?

by Ron Lavalette

ODE TO MY LITTLE BLACK PEBBLE

by Mary Perrin Scott

little black fly

by Edward Pontacoloni

letter

by Terry Rainey

the new addition

by Leslie Sittner

Steve Stern’s Two people hook up in a bar. They go back to one or the other’s apartment and fall into bed. In the morning, having experienced the most intense act of physical intimacy known to mortals, they wake up to realize that they are still complete strangers. Write a dialogue detailing their efforts (successful or not) to make some human connection. 🎯 Creative Writing Responses

Black Satin Sheets

by Lorraine Caramanna

untitled

by Ruth Ann Dandrea

The Pig Farmer in the city

by Linda Freedland

Etc.

by Paul Lamar

The adventures of corona & virus

by Mary Perrin Scott

book lust

by Terry Rainey

Baylee Annis’s Write a letter to someone or something nearby about the first time you met. You could write to your neighbor, to the house you live in, to your favorite bank teller, the path where you walk your dog, to the North Country region, or any other person/place you have affection for. 🏡 Creative Writing Responses

Destined to be

by Lorraine Caramanna

To My Granddaughter

by Ruth Ann Dandrea

The Holy Dip

by Karen Davidson Seward

Dear house

by Linda Elovitz Marshall

Cumberland Head Straits

by Jennifer Giambruno Gordon

All That different?

by William Gilbert

dear casa blanca

by Judyann Grant

Dear brand-new home

by Mary Perrin Scott

Lake Letter

by Edward Pontacoloni

Dear mary

by Nicholas Quarrier

dear loon in the distance

by Terry Rainey

Dear pepper

by Erica Jean Schwabach

Love from afar

by Hannah T. Williams

Joseph Bruchac’s prompt It’s your turn to inhale some inspiration. It might be a balsam pillow, an old baseball cap, a box of candy—whatever you have handy that has a strong enough scent to stimulate that olfactory cortex in the temporal lobe of your brain. Breathe in and write on. 🌾 Creative Writing Responses

Salt Water

by Courtney Allen

Soaps of the sixties

by Karen Bjornland

The scent of patchouli

by Kimberly Bouchard

Breath of Life

by Ruth Dandrea

Eau de mom

by Karen Davidson Seward

Common Scents

by Kernan Davis

Lavender

by Kathy DeLong

OUR ANNUAL FAMILY FIGHT-OUT

by Judyann Grant

An Odiferous Story

by June Hannay Kozier

What the Girls will remember

by Phyllis S. Hillinger

pipe tobacco

by Betsy Kepes

76 Broad Street

by Paul Lamar

HEMLOCK, SANDALWOOD, SAGE

by Ron Lavalette

Mother

by Mary Perrin Scott

SOUTH BEACH OLFACTORY

by Edward Pontacoloni

A Fish out of water

by Weezie Prescott

Ash wednesday

by Terry Rainey

michigan

by Eleanor Sweeney

Trout smells

by Tom Van de Water

molasses cookies

by Susan Whiteman

Jon Sands’ prompt I’ve been thinking a lot about the poem “Crazy Bunch Barbecue at Jefferson Park” by Willie Perdomo, from his book Smoking Lovely. In the vein of that piece, I want you to write a piece that begins with one of your favorite memories from one of your favorite places, paying special attention to the five senses. Then at some point in the piece, there should be a dedication to a person who wasn’t physically there. 🌱 Creative Writing Responses

Magic of the evening

by Janet Burl

River of Blood

by Ruth Dandrea

The Souls of a Barn

by Linda Elovitz Marshall

Forsythia

by Lisa Meissner

Manitoulin Island, Ontario

by Rebecca Northrup

Mother’s Day

by Annette Pisano-Higley

Umlaut

by Terry Rainey

Chosen option

by Sparker

A Perfect Day

by Eleanor Sweeney

Sue Halpern’s prompt It’s nine years after you were the officiant at a wedding for a couple you did not think should be together. Write that story. 🕯 Creative Writing Responses

Satin and Lace

by Ruth Ann Dandrea

Nine Years Later

by Kathy DeLong

Nine Minutes

by Phil Gallos

The Bowling Widow

by Ed Pontacoloni

Kismet

by Weezie Prescott

The Voodoo Wedding

by Cindy Snow

Mahogany L. Browne’s prompt I love you but can’t see you right now. 🌹 Use this as your first or last line of the poem: include 3 metaphors, 3 similes supporting the metaphor & 2 instances of dialogue & one COVID19 fact Creative Writing Responses

Directional

by Ruth Ann Dandrea

To my sister 04/21/20

by Amaryllis Doyle

I love you Aunt Ellen

by Judyann Grant

Alone

by Annette Pisano-Higley

It’s too dark

by Edward Pontacoloni

Untitled

by Weezie Prescott

Bill McKibben’s prompt The first few flakes of snow in the air on an autumn day… Creative Writing Responses

A Haiku

by Nancie Battaglia

UNtitled

by Kimberley Bouchard

Untitled

by Janet S. Burl

Untitled

by Bobbie Carnwath

Untitled

by Ruth Ann Dandrea

A Certain Breed

by J Dan Francis

Untitled

by Lee Keet

First Snowflakes in Autumn-Early 70’s

by Gary Lee

UNtitled

by Annette Pisano-Higley

Untitled

by Leslie Sittner

Julia Alvarez’s prompt write one haiku every day in April in honor of National Poetry Month Creative Writing Responses

Eleven Haiku

by Ruth Ann Dandrea

Haiku

by Doug Deneen

April Haiku

by Susan Jefts

Haiku from home

by Mila Lonetto

Daily Haiku

by Leslie Sittner

Betsy Folwell’s prompt Salt in the sugar bowl? Short-sheeting your brother’s bed? What happens when an April Fool’s joke goes terribly wrong. Creative Writing Responses

Double Reverse

by Ruth Ann Dandrea

April fool

by Kathy DeLong

A Very Smelly April Fool’s Prank

by William Gilbert

April fools day…a long time ago

by James Howard

Take Salt, Take sugar

by Susan Jefts

Sole Survivor

by Rob Sprogell

Prompt: How to turn a spider into your ally Creative Writing Responses

Webbed

by Ruth Ann Dandrea

Delia and Heywood

by Betsy Folwell

Barking dogs and jumping spiders

by Judyann Grant

A Spider’s Love

by  William Gilbert

Wolfy

by Jordan Magurk

The Life of a Dead Spider

by Beckie O’Neill

How to make a spider your ally

by M. A. Phillips

All Those Legs

by Leslie Sittner

“Words can be like X-rays if you use them properly – they’ll go through anything.” –Aldous HuxleyBrave New World


You might be at home, but you are not alone.

What remains during these tense times is ACW’s commitment to building spaces for healing together. Through weekly writing prompts and posted responses, new online classes, and the online display of PoemVillage, ACW is continuing to bring together community members like you during isolation and uncertainty.

Keeping ACW strong in these tense times now rests in the hands of faithful supporters like you. So, you are invited to give a gift of any amount. All gifts are significant in keeping ACW alive and well, so when this is all over ACW will be ready to re-launch the important programming you count on.

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